TOP Tips To Bust Strength Plateaus

TOP 6 Tips To Bust Strength Plateau's!! Lack of strength progression and increasing your physique can be as frustrating as difficulty losing weight and stubborn body fat!! As a former USA Powerlifting coach, I learned so many helpful tips to help my drug free athletes break strength plateaus and set World Records! Here are my top 6 coaching tips to help you break strength plateaus on your core lifts. The core lifts are categorized as (Squats, Bench Press, Deadlift, Power Clean, Hang Clean, Military Press). Plateauing On The Barbell Lifts- The key to progressing your barbell lifts is to make small poundage jumps on the last 2 sets of your repetition scheme! (Ex). If you are using percentage methods for your training I would do the following. Set#4 75% Set#5 77% and even 77.5% . Jump small and expect progression consistently! Never Train To Failure On The Core Lifts- I commonly see the novice lifter doing this. The no pain no gain theory is strictly for hypertrophy (bodybuilding). Training the core lift to failure causes 2 negative reactions in your strength progression. First, training to failure is so stressful on your body that it causes you to require massive rest periods. Second, training to failure can make it very difficult to use proper form and may cause injury. Save training to failure on the accessory movements like tricep, hamstrings, and other movements. Form is the key to progression and sports mastery! Use A Exercise Log- Many successful people in the strength world document many years of training. I use the logs for many reasons. I most frequently use to log to document training phases, mental state of the session, body weight and even detailed nutrition. The log will also help you recognize when your progress is slowing down. Commonly, plateaus will happen to the novice and experienced lifter at weeks 4-6. The log will prevent this. Rotate Your Accessory Exercises– Your accessory exercises are exercises that follow the core lifts. For example dumbbell bench press, lat pulldowns, tricep press downs, leg press, dumbbell bicep curls, upright rows, stiff legged deadlifts, and thousands of others. I recommend rotating these movements every 2 weeks and also changing the repetition of these movements. The rotation of the accessory movements will help your core lifts get stronger and keep your body craving change. Increase your protein and rest- When you feel a strength plateau coming then increase your protein and your rest. The protein requirements for strength athlete are 1.25-2 grams of protein per pound of body weight. The key is to evenly space that protein throughout your day. It is crucial that we ingest protein pre/post workout and also at bedtime. Sleep is crucial. Ed Coan, a legend of powerlifting, would sleep at least 10 hours per night. Ed would also nap in the afternoon. The sleep cycle is important for central nervous recovery! Supplement with branched chain amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks for new muscle production. Supplementing with L-glutamine and arginine are crucial to central system recovery! I hope these top 6 tips can benefit you in your strength program. These tips can implemented in all other types of fitness programs as well! REMEMBER NO BRAIN= NO GAINS!!Share it! Facebooktwitter

7 Tips For Successful Weight Management

In 1993 National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) was founded to study the behaviors of "successful losers." Those studied lost an average of 72 pounds, with a minimum weight loss of 30 pounds, and were able to keep the weight off for at least 5 years. Looking at various studies on obesity, the researchers found 7 common factors among those who were successful in maintaining their weight loss. 1. Eating a low-calorie, low-fat diet. Those studied ate an average of 1,385 calories per day (plus or minus 557), with an average of 26.6 percent coming from fat. Although 26.6 percent from fat may seem high to you, it is lower than the typical American's diet, which consists of simple carbs and ready-to-eat, low-cost processed food. Also, the researchers found that fast food visits were limited to less than ONE per month (step away from the fries!). 2. Participating in a high level of physical activity. Those studied burned an average of over 2,600 calories per day. This calorie burn came from doing normal, everyday physical activity, including a lot of walking. In fact, over 75 percent of the participants included walking as a form of exercise, with 48 percent of the total participants adding walking to other forms of exercise. Think it can't be done? The next time you go somewhere, try parking a little farther away and walking, take the stairs instead of the elevator, get off the bus or subway one stop sooner, or walk the dog around the block the next time you want to reach for a snack. It's a great way to get in a little more exercise time. 3. Limiting TV viewing. I heard something great the other day. Someone said that they had always made excuses about not having enough time to exercise. Yet, they always fit in 3 hours of TV viewing every night. Instead of plopping down in front of the TV at night, try to find other things to do. Why not take this time to pop in your favorite exercise DVD? Take a walk with your kids, read a book, or take a class. Not only will it get you moving, it also stimulates your brain in a way that TV viewing can't. It can also kill that urge for mindless snacking while watching TV. 4. Eating breakfast. Those studied rarely skipped breakfast. After "fasting" all night, your body actually needs the energy that a healthy breakfast can provide. Eating breakfast makes you less likely to grab that pastry in the kitchen at work or run out for fast food at lunchtime. It also keeps your metabolism going, so that your body doesn't shift into the "protect and conserve all fat" mode. 5. Maintaining dietary consistency. To the successful weight losers (or winners!), "diet" is not a bad word. They are always consistent with how many calories they are eating. There is no "cheat" day or falling off of the wagon during holidays or vacations. 6. Maintaining a high level of dietary restraint. This goes along with factor #5. Those who are successful at weight loss are always conscious about the types of foods that go in their mouths. When you are trying to maintain your hard-deserved weight loss, be conscious of the types of foods you are eating. One hundred calories of your favorite candy treat are not the same as 100 calories of a protein shake. But, if you "mess up," don't beat yourself up. Those who are successful at keeping the weight off jump right back in where they left off, which leads us to the last common factor . . . 7. Frequent self-weighing. Seventy-five percent of those looked at by the NWCR weighed themselves at least once a week, with almost half (44 percent) weighing in every day. This allowed them to keep track of any weight gain (or loss) and to address it before it became a "big" problem. Also included in this self-monitoring behavior was the continued counting of calories and fat grams. This continued "reinforcement" goes a long way toward keeping you on track for a slimmer today and healthier tomorrow. Michelle ChickchesterShare it! Facebooktwitter